Monday, April 28, 2014

Fishing in South Dakota


     Growing up on the farm, one of the things I most looked forward to was my uncle Ted taking us fishing.  I still hold those memories fondly in my heart.  We did not have much for fishing equipment, just a throw-line with a few of Dad's nuts for weights, and we caught mostly bullheads, but just going to the lake was a treat in itself.

     Now, I'm enjoying fishing again.  Recently my grandson and I went ice fishing.

Fishing at Waubay, South Dakota

    
    My grandson had a great time ice-fish fishing at at Waubay.  He not only caught the first fish, but he out fished his grandpa.  In fact, he caught twice as many fish as his granddad did.

Thursday, April 17, 2014

We can't forget the past


No matter how modern our new farm machinery is, it's hard for many farmers to forget the past.  Today many farmers have auto-steer, auto-turn tractors, but yet we still like to remember how grandpa used to farm with horses. We enjoy reliving how he farmed.

Lunch Time


Sherry is out checking with the boys about lunch ___ what time and where they'd like to eat.

Growing up on the farm, spending the day farming, I always found eating lunch one of the best moments of the day.

On a day like the one in this photo, one not only enjoys a great meal, but gets to share it with friends and neighbors, talking about how the farming is going. And eating outdoors was a little like having a picnic.

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Waiting Their Turn

The manure spreaders are lining up to get loaded. They seem to be able to haul manure faster then Chris can load it, but then again he is just using a skid loader.

Hauling Manure the Old Way


These young people are enjoying a warm sunny day hauling manure.  It's not everyday that one gets a chance to spread manure like grandpa used to do.  People in the coffee shop will be talking about this all year long.

The Way Lester Sees it

Lester just stopped over to watch the horses work. (haul manure) Lester just lives a little north-west of the farm.  He told one of the horses and wagon drivers the manure spreader should not have rubber wheels on it.  They used to be built with steel, and farmers loaded the manure with pitch forks, not with a skid-loader.  But the driver said they were doing this just for fun and not trying to make work out of it. Lester still felt they should do it right.

A New Job for the Quarter Horses

Laurin lives south west of Elkton and before he retired he ran a cow-calf operation along with a feedlot.  He used his quarter horses to check the cattle.  After he retired he started to break the quarter horses to pull machinery.  He said when he's working 3 horses, he puts the green horses in the middle and it works out pretty well.

Sunday, March 23, 2014

A Farmer Turned Electrician

Justin farms north of town, but after high school he went off to school to study to be an electrician. He worked for a number of years in the field, but his heart was still in farming. So now he is doing both. He has his own shop on Elk Street and he and his family farm north of town.

Electrician at Work

Justin is replacing the electrical outlets in a home here in Elkton.  Justin believes they were installed in the 60's and felt it was a good idea to replace them.

Thursday, February 04, 2010

Baling the ditch hay

I stopped to talk with Bill and Nella when they were out baling the ditch hay. Bill says he always likes to have some small square bales in the yard. He tells me, you never know when you'll need a few bales. There are always days in the winter when you have to get a cow and calf into the barn, and you have to feed and water them for a few days.

Farming is a way of life for Bill and Nella

For Bill and Nella, farming is a way of life. It is just part of their daily living. When a neighbor has to take a few days off to take in a wedding or visit family out of state, Bill and Nella step in and take care of his farm for him. Whether it's feeding and watering cattle or just looking after the farm, Bill and Nella just find it the neighborly thing to do.


Thursday, January 07, 2010

The bees, wind, and soybeans hard at work

I took this picture of Henning spraying his soybean field, and you can see that he has the bees working for him, too. He has to be careful and look out for them. In South Dakota, you can almost count on the wind blowing at one time or another, so the farmer puts the wind to work for us, turning out electricity. Nowadays, when the farmer tries to make a living off the land, he has to work with mother nature in more ways than one.


Henning out spraying

Hennning was out spraying his soybeans for the second time this season. He said he planned to spray them just once, but this year the weeds got a bit of a head start on him. Henning farms this field to get 40 bushels per acre: and he plants the seed, fertilizes, and sprays with that in mind.

But every farmer knows mother nature plays a very big part in farming. A farmer sometimes has to work with a late spring, not getting the rainfall at the right time, with an early frost, and so on.


Thursday, December 17, 2009

A farmer or a gardener?

I'm not sure what to call Rick, a farmer or a gardener? Rick has one of the largest, cleanest, and best- kept gardens in the area, and he still does most everything by hand. He also seems to plant just about a little of everything, and he does it in a big way--from flowers to onions.

What came first, the chicken or the egg?

Rick has more then his share of animals on his farm, but he does things a bit differently from most farmers. He takes the eggs from his own chickens and puts them in an incubator to hatch them out. He takes complete charge of his animals from birth to the kitchen table.


The potato and corn field

It was hard for me to find a weed in Rick's potatoes. It was so well kept, and his garden just seemed to run forever.